In the Money

Horse racing insight that's loose on the lead

Photo Album: Top 2-year-olds at Churchill Downs

July 6th, 2014

Some of the top 2-year-olds that competed at Churchill Downs during the Spring meet.

Conquest Bigluck E

(Lookin at Lucky)

Mark Casse/ Alan Garcia/Conquest Stables

One of the best-looking 2-year-olds on the grounds, this strapping chestnut could pass for a 3-year-old with his size and maturity. The half-brother of Smitten won his debut at 4.5 furlongs with ease.

Conquest Bigluck E

Conquest Bigluck E

conquest bigluck e 5

 

Take Charge Brandi

(Giant’s Causeway)

D. Wayne Lukas/Corey Lanerie/Willis Horton

In her debut, this striking filly lived up to the hype that came with her pedigree. Her dam, Charming, is half-sister of last year’s 3-year-old champion Will Take Charge. She resembles the champ in many ways, and although her pedigree didn’t signal early success, she beat what appeared to be a solid field with ease at 4.5 furlongs. She’s headed to Saratoga.

Take Charge Brandi

Take Charge Brandi

brandi4

Mr. Z

(Malibu Moon)

D. Wayne Lukas/Corey Lanerie/Zayat Stables

This chestnut colt looked ready to roll with a professional demeanor in the paddock prior to his debut. He pressed blazing fractions set by Louisiana Brown (:21. 54, :45.12), appeared beaten, was brought to the outside and re-rallied to win in an amazing performance at six furlongs.

Mr. Z

Mr. Z

Mr. Z sharp

 

 

Promise Me Silver

(Silver City)

W. Bret Calhoun/Robby Albarado/Robert Luttrell

This speedy gray filly by promising freshman sire Silver City easily moved from state-bred company at Lone Star to a Debutante Stakes win.

Promise Me Silver (Photo credit: Reed Palmer/Churchill Downs Photography)

Promise Me Silver (Photo credit: Reed Palmer/Churchill Downs Photography)

 

Cinco Charlie

(Indian Charlie)

Steve Asmussen/Shaun Bridgmohan/Corinne and William Heiligbrodt

A well-bred sprinter who was early to the winner’s circle, he won his debut at 4.5 furlongs on May 9. He returned on closing weekend to beat a decent field in the Grade 3 Bashford Manor. Both of his wins were gate to wire.

Cinco Charlie

Cinco Charlie

cinco char 5

Bedford Land

(Speightstown)

Mark Casse/Alan Garcia/Melnyk Racing Stables

On a steamy June day, this daughter of Grade 1 winner Pool Land showed her cool temperament by returning to the winner’s circle energetic and looking like she wanted to take another trip. Her debut was nothing short of perfect as she stalked, took the lead and drew off to win at 4.5 furlongs. She will be offered as part of the Melnyk dispersal at the Fasig-Tipton July sale.

Bedford Land

Bedford Land

Conquest Eclipse

(Malibu Moon)

Mark Casse/Shaun Bridgmohan/Conquest Stables

In a strong field of 11 going six furlongs, this filly didn’t let a rival pass, winning gate to wire on debut. One of several promising Malibu Moon youngsters to run at this meet.

Conquest Eclipse

Conquest Eclipse

conquest eclipse oo

Skipalute

(Midnight Lute)

Eddie Kenneally/Julien Leparoux/GoldMark Farm and Whisper Hill Farm

This registered black filly delivered a solid performance in her debut, going six-wide to rally for second behind Conquest Eclipse. She’s muscular and athletic; the future is bright.

Skipalute

Skipalute

Redlace and Pearls

(Line of David)

Steve Hobby/Joe Rocco, Jr./Alex and JoAnn Lieblong

A troubled trip in her debut, she was caught up in an early pace duel with Conquest Eclipse and couldn’t last. Physically she made quite an impression and could take some time to grow.

Redlace and Pearls

Redlace and Pearls

Desert Valley

(Desert Party)

Ian Wilkes/Brian Hernandez/Milner, Bloch, Seiler and Hall

This is a well-built router who should flourish once she stretches out. She was bumped at the start but still managed to rally for a late-closing fourth to Conquest Eclipse.

Desert Valley

Desert Valley

Conquest Archangel

(Blame)

Mark Casse/Shaun Bridgmohan/Conquest Stables

This daughter of new sire Blame was hampered by a troubled start in her debut. She rallied to finish second to the talented Take Charge Brandi at 4.5 furlongs. Out of the Pulpit dam Hot Attraction, she’ll enjoy longer distances.

Conquest Archangel

Conquest Archangel

Lucky Player

(Lookin at Lucky)

Steve Asmussen/Julien Leparoux/Jerry Durant

Although this Florida-bred never got going in the Bashford Manor Stakes, he’s one to watch for longer distances.

Lucky Player

Lucky Player

Hashtag Bourbon

(Super Saver)

Kellyn Gorder/Julien Leparoux/Bourbon Lane Stable

Last at the start of his debut, this colt made up substantial ground to finish third behind speedy pacesetters Mr. Z and Louisiana Brown. He won’t be  a maiden long.

Hashtag Bourbon

Hashtag Bourbon

Skyway

(Sky Mesa)

Mark Casse/Stewart Elliott/John Oxley

An even third in the Bashford Manor, he’s more dangerous on synthetic or turf, where he is tough to beat.

Skyway

Skyway

Oh Kay See

(Notional)

Steve Asmussen/Ricardo Santana/Asmsusen and Clark Brewster

The Pennsylvania-bred half-sister to So Many Ways likely needed that debut race in which she was fourth behind Take Charge Brandi. She boasts a quality, speedy pedigree.

KODAK Digital Still Camera

Also to watch:

Tapitsphere (Tapit) – Steve Asmussen/Rosie Napravnik/Winchell Thoroughbreds

Highway to Fame (Monarchos) – William Fires/Nathan Chaves/Anthony J. Foyt, Jr.

Lockport (Temple City) – Eddie Kenneally/Corey Lanerie/Kenneally, Greathouse, Logan

Sky Bistro (Sky Mesa) – Mark Casse/Stewart Elliott/John Oxley

Unbridled Reward (Warior’s Reward) – Mark Casse/Alan Garcia/John Oxley

Boomshakalaka (Sky Mesa) – Bernard Flint/Francisco Torres/Bernard Muth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Album: Spring meet closing weekend at Churchill Downs

July 5th, 2014
Silver Max and Robby Albarado after a win in the Firecracker

Silver Max and Robby Albarado after a win in the Firecracker

Guys Reward, third in the Firecracker

Guys Reward, third in the Firecracker

Conquest Eclipse, by Malibu Moon, prior to her debut win Sunday

Conquest Eclipse, by Malibu Moon, prior to her debut win Sunday

 

Mr. Z, son of Malibu Moon, cools off after his debut win

Mr. Z, son of Malibu Moon, cools off after his debut win

Apprentice jockey Juan Saez ended a very successful meet with a win on Alaco Castle

Apprentice jockey Juan Saez ended a very successful meet with a win on Alaco Castle

Apprentice jockey Erin Walker with a Calvin-like move up the rail to win with On Lockdown Sunday

Apprentice jockey Erin Walker with a Calvin-like move up the rail to win with On Lockdown Sunday

Julien Leparoux celebrates with a young fan in the winner's circle Sunday

Julien Leparoux celebrates with a young fan in the winner’s circle Sunday

Meet leaders: jockey Corey Lanerie, trainer Steve Asmussen, owner Maggi Moss

Meet leaders: jockey Corey Lanerie, trainer Steve Asmussen, owner Maggi Moss

Silverhill, trained by Bret Calhoun, gets some encouragement before the Bashford Manor. He finished second.

Silverhill, trained by Bret Calhoun, gets some encouragement before the Bashford Manor. He finished second.

Government Shutdown was fifth in the Bashford Manor

Government Shutdown was fifth in the Bashford Manor

Cinco Charlie, son of Indian Charlie trained by Steve Asmsusen

Cinco Charlie, son of Indian Charlie trained by Steve Asmsusen

Bashford Manor winner Cinco Charlie and Shaun Bridgmohan

Bashford Manor winner Cinco Charlie and Shaun Bridgmohan

Firecracker trophy presentation

Firecracker trophy presentation

 

For Goodness Sake has emerged as a 3-year-old to watch

For Goodness Sake has emerged as a 3-year-old to watch

Kelly's Landing winner Good Lord has won two straight

Kelly’s Landing winner Good Lord has won two straight

Silver Max post-race

Silver Max post-race

The Bashford Manor, Kelly’s Landing and Firecracker were just a few highlights from closing weekend of the 2014 spring meet at Churchill Downs.

 

Golden Soul, 2013 Kentucky Derby runner-up, finished third in an allowance won by For Goodness Sake; Calvin Borel aboard

Golden Soul, 2013 Kentucky Derby runner-up, finished third in an allowance won by For Goodness Sake; Calvin Borel aboard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anatomy of a Triple Crown loss: Real Quiet

June 5th, 2014

logo 1By J.J. HYSELL

One year after his Triple Crown hopeful Silver Charm suffered an agonizing loss to Touch Gold in the Belmont Stakes, trainer Bob Baffert, the hero of racing in the late 1990’s, returned to Big Sandy in 1998 with another chance in Real Quiet.

This showdown between the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner and late-running rival Victory Gallop, the Derby and Preakness runner-up, will never be classified as just a horse race. A tale of a rangy, unheralded, $17,000 colt nicknamed “The Fish” trying to end a drought dating back to 1978? Yes.

A story of two jockeys, veterans, one under fire for his rides with something to prove and the other playing the role of spoiler this time around? Of course.

A mind-blowing ending with multiple subplots? You bet.

Jockey Gary Stevens felt the sting of Triple Crown heartbreak in that defeat aboard Silver Charm. This time, he would be the one delivering the punch to the gut via an exquisite ride aboard an Ontario-bred who was originally bought with the Queen’s Plate in Canada in mind.

Jockey Kent Desormeaux, confident and proud of the horse that was considered one of Baffert’s bench players before the Triple Crown trail, endured criticism for his handling of Real Quiet. They said he moved too soon on the colt, whose trademark was a bold middle move with an explosive burst of speed.

Baffert defended him.

“Sometimes when a horse wants to go and you hold him back, he’s not going to have that same punch,” Baffert said.

Real Quiet wasn’t just running for history. His owner, Mike Pegram, was in line to pocket a $5 million bonus from Visa, then-sponsor of the Triple Crown. The saga of this common-looking colt with uncommon speed, with his embattled pilot and popular trainer, was reaching an unforeseen plateau.

Not everyone was convinced. Various scribes at Belmont dismissed his chances in the Test of the Champion. Some went as far as to say even if he did win, he wasn’t really worthy because it was a weak crop hampered by injuries to its marquee prospects.

Momentum was in Real Quiet’s favor a week from the race. He was training superbly at Churchill Downs ahead of his date with destiny. With fans now convinced, the bandwagon filled up, and Baffert’s effervescent nature landed horse racing on front pages daily. 

Meanwhile, Victory Gallop was falling out of favor among pundits. He developed a nasty skin rash after the Preakness that caused him to miss training and left him with just one opportunity to work before the Belmont. The taxing Preakness effort also caused him to shed weight. Hard luck extended to Victory Gallop’s young trainer, Elliott Walden, who broke his ankle in a pick-up basketball game prior to the race and was forced to navigate on crutches. He enlisted the help of Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott, who would saddle Victory Gallop on Belmont day.

Still, the Victory Gallop team was undeterred. Walden met with Stevens the day before the race and they devised a plan. They knew Real Quiet’s weakness – and it played right to Victory Gallop’s strength.

“Let Real Quiet make his move,” Walden instructed Stevens. “Don’t try to go with him.”

Clear skies greeted the crowd of 80,162 and a fast track set the stage for one of the most memorable editions of the 12-furlong race.

Victory Gallop marched into the paddock a different horse. “He had a glow in his eye,” Stevens said. Other than a small area on his back, the colt’s coat showed no signs of the issue that had plagued him just a week ago. He shined. When Stevens climbed aboard and gathered the reins, the colt swelled up, arched his neck and started prancing.

As Stevens guided Victory Gallop to the tunnel, he heard a voice shouting something his direction. He knew who it was. He didn’t shift his focus.

It was Baffert.

“I know what he was trying to do,” Stevens said. “He was trying to get me out of it. That’s his job.”

Baffert wasn’t without his own agitators. As the trainer made his way up to his seat, he passed a gaggle of hecklers. One held up a sign that said: “Bob, not today.” It didn’t help that when Baffert got to his seat, his son mentioned the sign, like it was an omen.

As expected, speedy Chillito and Robbie Davis set the early pace with Grand Slam and Jerry Bailey tagging along closely. Limit Out joined the leaders and formed a trio up front that escorted a stalking Real Quiet in the prime spot.

“I folded into the first turn and had him right between horses,” Desormeaux said. “He didn’t get a grain of sand in his face.”

Desormeaux kept his colt behind the speed until they maneuvered into the second turn.

“I moved him to the outside and he just started cantering,” he said. “He was in an absolute canter.”

Meanwhile, Victory Gallop remained at the back of the pack, weaving his way through traffic and biding his time.

“I was bumped the first time at the five-sixteenths pole, when I was going between horses,” Stevens said.

In a moment that still elicits goose bumps, Real Quiet zoomed by Chillito with a sudden turn of foot that put him squarely on the lead.

“It was very difficult to hit the three-eighths pole and see Real Quiet opening up on me and not move, not push the button,” Stevens said. “I wanted to push the button, believe me.”

The margin grew. The crowd roared. Real Quiet was separating himself from the rest of the field.

“When he turned for home on the lead, I wanted to cry,” Baffert said.

Real Quiet was all alone nearing the eighth-pole.

“I had flashbacks to Churchill Downs (the Derby), that we might not get there,” Walden said.

The Fish and the silver-haired trainer were about to deliver the moment the racing world had dreamed of for 20 years.

Or so it appeared.

Desormeaux, sensing trouble, turned to look behind him and saw a hard-charging Victory Gallop bearing down.

“My momentum was changing,” he said. “I knew he was starting to slow down being lost on the lead.”

Suddenly, Victory Gallop, on the outside, was alongside his rival and going head-to-head. With his mount struggling just a few strides from the finish, Desormeaux tugged blinkered Real Quiet’s head in an attempt to get him to see his challenger.

“I pulled his head up a little too hard,” Desormeaux said.

It caused Real Quiet to shift into Victory Gallop.

“It more or less stopped our colt,” Stevens said of the contact.

The pair reached the wire in unison. Stunned fans didn’t know whether to celebrate or head for the aisles. Who won?

Baffert asked trainer D. Wayne Lukas. Lukas said, ‘You’ve got it.” Baffert remained cautious.

“I absolutely had no idea (who won),” Stevens said.

To add to the confusion, someone had lodged an objection, but no one knew who or why. It was Stevens, who had called to an outrider when he was pulling up to notify stewards that he had been bumped.

It wouldn’t matter.

Victory Gallop won the Belmont Stakes by a nose.

“He put in his run and he flattened out at the end,” Baffert said. “The Fish floundered and that was it.”

Veteran jockey Chris McCarron, who was third aboard Thomas Jo, delivered words of encouragement to Desormeaux in the jockeys’ room. He told Desormeaux not to worry about it. He was still a champion and there would be more to come.

Asked by a reporter if he felt the loss was his fault for a premature move, Desormeaux responded, “Somewhat, yes.”

Baffert interrupted. “It was not his fault. It’s not his fault. If he would have waited, that horse wouldn’t have had that punch. That’s his style.”

Last year, it was Stevens feeling the pinch. He watched Desormeaux going through the same turmoil in the paddock, one year later.

“He probably feels like he’s let the whole country down,” Stevens said. “He has nothing to be ashamed of.”

Baffert suffered through the nose loss by Cavonnier to Grindstone in the 1996 Kentucky Derby, Silver Charm’s defeat and now strike three. Although the light in his eyes had dimmed, the light remained.

“Eventually I’m going to win this thing,” he said.

 

Respect still eludes Derby winner California Chrome

May 8th, 2014

By J.J. Hysell

By most accounts, you would think California Chrome rolled into Churchill Downs a mythical hero about to be exposed.

Possibly the least-heralded favorite in the past 10 years of the Kentucky Derby, the California-bred inspired bewilderment, not amazement, among the masses gathered along the rail in the days leading up to the race.

“He’s not as big as I thought he was,” one onlooker said.

California Chrome: The Rodney Dangerfield of Derby winners?

California Chrome: The Rodney Dangerfield of Derby winners?

Another backstretch regular dismissed his chances like crumpling and tossing a hot dog wrapper. “It’s different here,” he said. “This isn’t Los Alamitos.”

The Los Alamitos he referenced, where California Chrome trained in the mornings, is a race course in California that is home to both Quarter Horse and Thoroughbred racing. It is a track that previously lingered in the shadows of mighty Santa Anita and the now defunct Hollywood Park in status.

Granted, the “Los Alamitos Legend” was built up to peerless standards by the West Coast pundits. They proclaimed the chestnut colt as a paragon of equine superiority. He was the spirit born of co-owner Steve Coburn’s dream and the inspiration from Swaps, the stallion of 77-year-old trainer Art Sherman’s youth, who was destined for distinction.

Coburn even called the Derby in California Chrome’s favor, in Joe Namath-like fashion, in the weeks leading up to May 3.

It seemed the reverence was mostly confined to the Golden State. California Chrome’s powerful aura evaporated with each passing mile once he shipped east. The story was too good to be true, some said, and his repertoire was picked apart: never raced outside of California, a cheap pedigree, ten career starts, and the trusty “Who did he beat?”

The most disparaged Derby favorite in recent memory was about to silence the peanut gallery and bring the inconceivable story to life.

With jockey Victor Espinoza aboard, the Los Alamitos Legend tracked the tepid pace, accelerated when asked and cruised home to become the first California-bred to wear the roses since Decidedly in 1962.

Even in afterglow, as the Preakness awaits, there remains an umbrella of skepticism. California Chrome’s final time of 2:03.66 for the 10 furlongs is the slowest over a fast track since 1974, thus earning him mediocre speed figures and ratings.

Some said his stellar performance paled in light of Kentucky Oaks winner Untapable; that was a race at nine furlongs with a field of 12 fillies. Others predict an easy trip for California Chrome in Baltimore, but he’ll be a bust at Belmont.

Mythical hero California Chrome, the Rodney Dangerfield of Derby winners, has yet to be exposed.

 

 

 

Photo Album: Kentucky Derby 2014

May 6th, 2014

California Chrome was convincing with a win as the favorite in Kentucky Derby 140.

Chrome taking it all in

Chrome taking it all in

 

Danza, third

Danza, third

 

Tapiture, 15th, and Steve Asmussen

Tapiture, 15th, and Steve Asmussen

 

Medal Count, eighth

Medal Count, eighth

 

California Chrome enjoying himself

California Chrome enjoying himself

 

Commanding Curve, second

Commanding Curve, second

 

Hoppertunity was scratched two days before the race. He had ankle surgery and will miss the rest of the Triple Crown season.

Hoppertunity was scratched two days before the race. He had ankle surgery and will miss the rest of the Triple Crown season.

 

General a Rod after his pre-Derby work. He was 11th.

General a Rod after his pre-Derby work. He was 11th.

 

Uncle Sigh wore blinkers with a purple heart for Wounded Warriors

Uncle Sigh wore blinkers with a purple heart for Wounded Warriors. He was 14th,

 

Dance With Fate always eye-catching. He was sixth.

Dance With Fate always eye-catching. He was sixth.

 

California Chrome was backed off the van on arrival.

California Chrome was backed off the van on arrival.

 

The scene on Monday before the Derby

The scene on Monday before the Derby

 

Wildcat Red was 18th. He suffered a cut on his right side during the race.

Wildcat Red was 18th. He suffered a cut on his right side during the race.

 

Gary Stevens beneath the Twin Spires on Candy Boy

Gary Stevens beneath the Twin Spires on Candy Boy

 

Ride On Curlin, seventh

Ride On Curlin, seventh

 

Medal Count in full flight

Medal Count in full flight

 

 

Wildcat Red trainer Jose Garoffalo

Wildcat Red trainer Jose Garoffalo

 

Wicked Strong trainer Jimmy Jerkens, wearing a New York Giants hat

Wicked Strong trainer Jimmy Jerkens, wearing a New York Giants hat

 

Wicked Strong drew fans' attention while schooling

Wicked Strong drew fans’ attention while schooling. He was fourth.

 

Fans watch the works

Fans watch the works

 

The Big Board at sunrise

The Big Board at sunrise

 

Chitu was named for a famous horse in Chinese history. He finished ninth.

Chitu was named for a famous horse in Chinese history. He finished ninth.

 

In the end, Chrome proved the deserving favorite

In the end, Chrome proved the deserving favorite

 

 

 

Photo Album: Kentucky Oaks 2014

May 5th, 2014

Untapable, ridden by Rosie Napravnik and trained by Steve Asmussen, stamps herself as a star with an impressive win in the Kentucky Oaks.

My Miss Sophia, second, was a little feisty before the race

My Miss Sophia, second, was a little feisty before the race

 

Rosie Napravnik wins her second Kentucky Oaks

Rosie Napravnik wins her second Kentucky Oaks

 

My Miss Sophia, second, trained very well over the track

My Miss Sophia, second, trained very well over the track

 

Untapable schooling in the paddock days before her victory

Untapable schooling in the paddock days before her victory

 

Start of Oaks 140

Start of Oaks 140

 

Rosie celebrates

Rosie celebrates

 

Runner-up My Miss Sophia

Runner-up My Miss Sophia

 

Trainer Steve Asmussen happy with his filly's performance

Trainer Steve Asmussen happy with his filly’s performance

 

Fans watch the Oaks on the "Big Board"

Fans watch the Oaks on the “Big Board”

 

Oaks eve

Oaks eve

 

Outriders in pink

Outriders in pink

 

Thank You Marylou, fifth

Thank You Marylou, fifth

 

 

A percentage of Empress of Midway was bought by Louisville coach Rick Pitino a week before the Oaks. She was scratched after a gate incident just before the start. Trainer Doug O'Neill reports she is doing fine and will fly back to California.

A percentage of Empress of Midway was bought by Louisville coach Rick Pitino a week before the Oaks. She was scratched after a gate incident just before the start. Trainer Doug O’Neill reports she is doing fine and will fly back to California.

 

Got Lucky (seventh) and My Miss Sophia (second) work in tandem

Got Lucky (seventh) and My Miss Sophia (second) work in tandem

 

Rosalind, fourth, is always running well late

Rosalind, fourth, is always running well late

 

 

Aurelia's Belle, ninth, wore a special screen eye protector when training.

Aurelia’s Belle, ninth, wore a special screen eye protector when training.

 

Unbridled Forever, third, is one to watch

Unbridled Forever, third, is one to watch

 

 

 

Photo Album: 2014 Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland

April 14th, 2014

Dance With Fate, a son of Two Step Salsa trained by Peter Eurton and ridden by Corey Nakatani, won Saturday’s Grade 1 Blue Grass Stakes.

Dance With Fate strikes a pose after his Grade 1 win

Dance With Fate strikes a pose after his Grade 1 win

 

Corey Nakatani and his daughter celebrate in the winner's circle

Corey Nakatani and his daughter celebrate in the winner’s circle

 

Blue Grass contenders wait to get their lip tattoo checked

Blue Grass contenders wait to get their lip tattoos checked

 

Bobby's Kitten finished 12th as the favorite

Bobby’s Kitten finished 12th as the favorite

 

Extrasexyhippszter is a fan favorite

Extrasexyhippszter is a fan favorite

 

Dawn Mellen, part of Team Dance With Fate, celebrates with friends

Dawn Mellen, part of Team Dance With Fate, celebrates with friends

 

Corey Nakatani and his daughter after the big win

Corey Nakatani and his daughter after the big win

 

Dance With Fate looking happy post-race

Dance With Fate looking happy post-race

 

There's a lot happening in the winner's circle

There’s a lot happening in the winner’s circle

 

crowd

 

 

Photo Album: Wise Dan triumphant in Maker’s 46 Mile

April 11th, 2014

Two-time Horse of the Year Wise Dan won his second straight Maker’s 46 Mile at Keeneland Friday.

Wise Dan looked great post-race

Wise Dan looked great post-race

 

wise dan mmm 8

 

Trainer Charlie LoPresti being interviewed by TVG's Caleb Keller

Trainer Charlie LoPresti being interviewed by TVG’s Caleb Keller

 

Wise Dan makes an entrance

Wise Dan makes an entrance

 

LoPresti tends to an active Wise Dan

LoPresti tends to an active Wise Dan

 

wise dan mmm 7

 

Do I look OK for my 2014 debut?

Do I look OK for my 2014 debut?

 

 

Morton and Elaine Fink make their way to the winner's circle

Morton and Elaine Fink make their way to the winner’s circle

 

Happy to have the saddle back on again

Happy to have the saddle back on again

 

Gentleman's Kitten was fifth

Gentleman’s Kitten was fifth

 

The Wise Dan connections, including Mort Fink, who was awarded the gold trophy by Keeneland for eight graded stakes wins as an owner

The Wise Dan connections, including Mort Fink, who was awarded the gold trophy by Keeneland for eight graded stakes wins as an owner

 

 

Clark Handicap 2013: A photo album

November 29th, 2013

Will Take Charge out-duels Game on Dude in one of the best editions of the Clark Handicap in recent memory.

wtcgood

 

 

Joe Torre came to see Game on Dude

Joe Torre came to see Game on Dude

 

 

Game on Dude makes his entrance

Game on Dude makes his entrance

 

 

The crowd gathers before the Clark

The crowd gathers before the Clark

 

Will Take Charge upon arrival

Will Take Charge upon arrival

 

 

Willis Horton leads in Will Take Charge

Willis Horton leads in Will Take Charge

 

The happy winner's circle

The happy winner’s circle

 

 

Jockey Rosemary Homeister in the house

Jockey Rosemary Homeister in the house

 

 

 

 

Stars of Tomorrow 1: Photo Album

October 27th, 2013

Behind the scenes at the first Stars of Tomorrow program – all 2-year-old races – at Churchill Downs Sunday, Oct. 27.

All images, copy and material in this post are copyright In the Money and may not be reproduced or published without prior consent.

Miguel Mena celebrates aboard Son of a Preacher, son of Pulpit and impressive winner of the fourth race.

Miguel Mena celebrates aboard Son of a Preacher, son of Pulpit

 

Tiger Bourbon, long-striding son of Big Brown, dropped back to allowance and won impressively for Rosie Napravnik and Eddie Kenneally

Tiger Bourbon, a long-striding son of Big Brown

 

Canaryinacoalmine, with Joe Rocco, Jr, up, broke her maiden in her second start for trainer Steve Margolis. She's by Birdstone.

Canaryinacoalmine, with Joe Rocco, Jr, up, broke her maiden in her second start for trainer Steve Margolis. She’s by Birdstone.

 

Cee 'n O, a son of Silver Train who was third in the Arlington-Washington Futurity, was sixth in the Street Sense. He might prefer synthetic and turf.

Cee ‘n O, a son of Silver Train who was third in the Arlington-Washington Futurity, was sixth in the Street Sense. He might prefer synthetic and turf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coastline, a son of Speightstown, is now 2 of 3 with one second after winning the Street Sense for trainer Mark Casse. He's a very professional type; mature for a 2-year-old.

Coastline, a son of Speightstown, is now 2 of 3 with one second after winning the Street Sense for trainer Mark Casse. He’s a very professional type; mature for a 2-year-old.

 

Albano, half-brother of Mark Valeski, trained by Larry Jones. The son of Istan finished third.

Albano, half-brother of Mark Valeski, trained by Larry Jones. The son of Istan finished third.

 

And You Can, a half-sister to Kentucky Oaks winner Believe You Can, was eighth in her debut.

And You Can, a half-sister to Kentucky Oaks winner Believe You Can, was eighth in her debut.

 

Ducasa, a Discreet Cat filly trying dirt for the first time, and Norberto Arroyo with the win,

Ducasa, a Discreet Cat filly trying dirt for the first time, and Norberto Arroyo with the win.

 

Shaun Bridgmohan and Street Sense winner Coastline.

Shaun Bridgmohan and Street Sense winner Coastline.

 

A return to dirt benefitted Culprit, who broke his maiden in his third start for Donegal, Dale Romans and Corey Lanerie.

A return to dirt helped Culprit

 

A moment with Indian Pegasus

A moment with Indian Pegasus

 

Norberto Arroyo, Jr. celebrates with a fam after winning aboard Ducasa.

Norberto Arroyo, Jr. celebrates with a fan after winning aboard Ducasa.

 

Wouldn't You Know, son of Speightstown, and a smiling Joe Rocco, Jr.

Wouldn’t You Know, son of Speightstown, and a smiling Joe Rocco, Jr.

 

Gambler's Rose, a half-sister of Thiskyhasnolimit, was a valiant second in her second start for Dale Romans.

Gambler’s Rose, a half-sister of Thiskyhasnolimit, was a valiant second in her second start for Dale Romans.

 

Florida-bred Kwacha

Florida-bred Kwacha was quite animated before her fourth start.

 

Ride on Curlin, third in the Street Sense, is always running well late.

Ride on Curlin, third in the Street Sense, is always running well late.

 

Little Baker, son of Forestry, was fourth in his second start.

Little Baker, son of Forestry, was fourth in his second start.

 

Rags to Riches winner Clever Beauty, by Indian Charlie, is now 2 for 2 at Churchill Downs.

Rags to Riches winner Clever Beauty, by Indian Charlie, is now 2 for 2 at Churchill Downs.

 

Springboard was a Spring At Last first-time dirt play.

Springboard was a Spring At Last progeny first-time dirt play.

 

Winston, friend of many horses at Churchill Downs, decked out for Halloween.

Winston, friend of many horses at Churchill Downs, decked out for Halloween.